Try to think of the day split by the light changes. The light is different, subjects change in meaning, places take a different tone, and you may be either tired or full of energy.

However you are feeling, If you want to be taken serious as a Street Photographer, you will need to work on these three essential things. Your ability to tell a story within a photo. Your ability to capture a moment. And, finally, the ability to use light. The final one can of course be rendered, and we know the first two can’t, but it still takes knowledge and a little experience to work with the sun.

If you have your camera a while, you know Light can be used in different ways all throughout the day, but in the morning and the evening you need to be careful about your eyes, and take care of the flare. A hood will not protect you fully at these times, or a filter. Do not look directly in to the sun whatever other people tell you.

The best way to take the photo when looking straight at the sun is through a swivel screen. My Lumix G5 had one. My Nikon did not. Make sure your subject, the sun in this case, is centred using something in the foreground, and try to incorporate a storyline.

The objects you use to sell your subject will become silhouettes if you have set yourself up right. Below the old Dublin meets the New Dublin, as the sun goes down on another gorgeous day in the Capital. The moment in time is captured through the setting Sun, and the camera is at such an angle flare is less obvious.

What is Lens Flare

“Lens flare, also called veiling glare, is caused by light reflecting inside the lens, either from lens surfaces or from internal components in the lens. … Problem causing flare is usually caused by very bright lights within the image area, such as the sun in the sky, or just outside the image area.”

Silhouette of the Jeannie Johnson Famine Ship on the River Liffey